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Paul Nelson, Fargo, letter: Name Ninth Street with unifying name

While I acknowledge that the renaming of Ninth Street in West Fargo seems trivial, I believe that it should not be taken lightly. It is not often that a city gets to rename a major street. It is probably the easiest street in the whole community ...

While I acknowledge that the renaming of Ninth Street in West Fargo seems trivial, I believe that it should not be taken lightly. It is not often that a city gets to rename a major street. It is probably the easiest street in the whole community to rename. There are very few, if any, residences that have Ninth Street as their address, and only a couple of businesses would have to go through the hassle that an address change would bring.

I respectfully disagree with "Division" as a street name. By definition, it means to divide. This is hardly the sentiment that the uniting of Fargo and West Fargo south of the interstate is trying to convey.

I would suggest some other names that might be appropriate.

Since there is a high school, a middle school and grade schools either on Ninth Street or in close proximity of Ninth Street, the name Agassiz Drive might be considered. Louis Agassiz was considered one of America's greatest educators.

I favor Martin Luther King Drive or King Drive. This would honor the teachings of this great man. His vision is consistent with the "coming together" of Fargo and West Fargo.

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There are many other names that could be considered. I think that some time should be spent on coming up with a name that unites rather than divides.

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