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Plain Talk: Dot's Pretzels, the special session, redistricting, and the culture wars

Listen to the latest episode of Rob Port's Plain Talk Live.

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Demonstrators hold signs Monday, Nov. 8, 2021, at the "We the People" rally outside the North Dakota Capitol in Bismarck. Kyle Martin / The Forum
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North Dakota snack food startup Dot's Pretzels has been acquired for $1.2 billion.

The special session of the Legislature continues with fights over redistricting and culture war bills dominate.

Rob Port and Chad Oban talk about these issues and more.

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Rob Port, founder of SayAnythingBlog.com, is a Forum Communications commentator. Reach him on Twitter at @robport or via email at rport@forumcomm.com .

Opinion by Rob Port
Rob Port is a news reporter, columnist, and podcast host for the Forum News Service. He has an extensive background in investigations and public records. He has covered political events in North Dakota and the upper Midwest for two decades. Reach him at rport@forumcomm.com. Click here to subscribe to his Plain Talk podcast.
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