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Proposals to curb unemployment

Fargo When you have a job, it is all too easy to forget about those who, through no fault of their own, do not have one or just lost theirs. Watch the 6 o'clock news, and it looks like an unemployment pandemic of sorts. The solution is in a chang...

Fargo

When you have a job, it is all too easy to forget about those who, through no fault of their own, do not have one or just lost theirs. Watch the 6 o'clock news, and it looks like an unemployment pandemic of sorts.

The solution is in a change in how people can get back employment opportunities that have been lost due to many reasons that are just not worth the analysis because the solution is known and yet no government or senior business executive seems to have the formula to make it happen.

Here are some not-so-easy solutions to get back jobs into the hands of the unemployed in this country:

- First, institute limited and targeted domestic tariffs immediately (say 30 percent) to keep foreign auto manufacturers from selling their products in the U.S. The U.S. sells a limited amount of auto products in other countries such as Japan and Korea, so there would be very little retaliation. In other words, protect the U.S. market from autos and parts made abroad with foreign labor. Review all free-trade agreements now.

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- Repeat the auto tariff idea by going after computer-manufactured parts made in offshore countries that literally steal jobs from U.S. employees. Outsourcing all jobs and service work to foreign countries has to be restricted to protect U.S. workers as well. Stricter labor laws anyone?

- Revamp the bankruptcy laws to allow large U.S. companies to reorganize employee benefit programs and executive compensation that was given away generously in the 1970s and '80s when times were good and allow a court ordered review (restructuring) of these programs so that particular industries (e.g.: auto, mortgage lenders, banks and airlines) can survive and not look to government bailouts for money.

- Review all war spending in Iraq and Afghanistan immediately and make these countries start to pay a fair share of the costs of the U.S presence there. Otherwise, bring the troops home so that the money can be spent on domestic infrastructure here. Ten billion dollars a month spent on any program is just too costly if the benefits are not forthcoming to the U.S and we are burdened with rising unemployment.

- I feel that anybody who cannot find a job must start retraining for jobs that are available no matter how different that new job may be. We need a free national and state job database to assist employers and anyone seeking employment now. A lot of jobs in small businesses that can be done are oftentimes ignored due to lack of matching job information available by the employer with the employee. I deplore exorbitant fees charged by placement firms that prey on the unemployed.

Space limits further discussion, but the job solutions are many more. Stay tuned.

We are all human beings who like to work at jobs and contribute to our society; to that end we must change the job ballgame now or watch the unemployment lines increase due to our lack of using creative job opportunities.

So get moving, workers, and never stop fighting for a good and better-paying job. No matter where you are on the economic ladder, the bottom rung of being unemployed is no fun.

There is no better feeling in the world than having a job so you can pay your way in the world. The U.S has a lot of hidden wealth in young, old and other creative individuals who can open windows to make jobs happen.

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