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Ron Schmidt letter: Evidence is clear: Zionism is racism

In regard to the letter of K.W. Simons (Forum, April 27): A voice in the wilderness. While not being in complete agreement with the tone of his letter, I am in agreement with the substance.

In regard to the letter of K.W. Simons (Forum, April 27): A voice in the wilderness. While not being in complete agreement with the tone of his letter, I am in agreement with the substance.

Anytime someone questions the actions of the state of Israel, one is likely to be called anti-Semitic. In other words, a "bigot."

Black and white. For us or against us. The simplicity of American and Israeli anti-intellectualism; no need to bother with the details.

Why are so many Americans so adamantly justifying whatever Israel did in Jenin while Israel is so adamantly denying that whatever it did was unjustified? How can one support what another did when the other says it didn't do it? Unfortunately, in the denial of equivalence, the rationale has become that if one is worse, the other is OK.

The purpose of Jewish settlements in the West Bank is to colonize in order to create the Greater Israel. In so many ways it is reminiscent of the American West. Settlers would move on to Native American lands. In reprisal for this theft, the indigenous people would attack and often kill the settlers and their families. Even when some settlers were killed, others would continue to put themselves and their families in harm's way. As Sitting Bull said, "The need to own land is like a sickness with the White Man."

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Zionism is racism. As "God's Chosen People," the chosen ones are special with a predetermined destiny. We may say, "a manifest destiny." As is so often with patriotism, the refuge of the demagogue and the scoundrel. It is the antithesis of reason.

Ron Schmidt

Tolna, N.D.

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