ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Terry DeVine column: 'Bad Dream' is a real nail-biter

Bill Duke really gets around. He's been just about everywhere. The Fargo child psychologist and California native has studied, taught, and counseled troubled children in several different places around the country over the years. He's goo...

Bill Duke really gets around. He's been just about everywhere.

The Fargo child psychologist and California native has studied, taught, and counseled troubled children in several different places around the country over the years. He's good at it.

But he's also an author, and the place he enjoys most of all is right in his own home in Fargo, listening to his music and writing suspense novels.

His debut novel, "Bad Dream," is in the bookstores and being received well critically. It takes the reader into a subject that is every parent's worst nightmare -- child abduction. It's gotten good reviews on Amazon.com, Duke said, and can be ordered there.

Duke has been flying all over the country in his high-performance airplane, which he flies out of the Moorhead Municipal Airport, to book signings. He and wife, Dr. Denise Duke, a clinical psychologist, recently returned from an appearance at the new Barnes & Noble bookstore in Orange, Calif.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Dukes came to North Dakota 11 years ago and he did post-doctoral work and taught at the University of North Dakota Medical School in Fargo for seven years. He and his wife have a joint practice in the Moorhead Center Mall. He works two days a week at the office and spends the rest of the time writing. She works the other days.

This isn't Duke's first book. Prentice Hall published a textbook he wrote, and he published another nonfiction work called "Smart Parenting." But this is his first published work of fiction.

He landed a national distributor, Ingram Book Co., which has helped a great deal, he said, because places like Barnes & Noble, B Dalton, and Borders, or any other bookseller, can order copies online and have them shipped in immediately.

"I find writing challenging, but I enjoy the outcome," said Duke. "I just start writing and then I go back and rewrite. I think I rewrote 'Bad Dream' eight times."

"Bad Dream" takes readers into the world of kidnapped 10-year-old Megan Ambrose. One review called it a "dark, brooding saga of razor tension."

The organization Child Find said it receives more than 20,000 hot-line calls a year from distraught parents regarding missing children. Each year an estimated 600 children are the victims of stranger abduction. The number jumps into the thousands if one adds parent abductions.

Duke said he put his first book, a medical suspense novel with elements of biological terrorism in it, on the shelf, but will likely return to it at some point and rework it to his satisfaction.

He's already well into a third book, "The Outlier," which is about a professor and his daughter whose wife and mother was murdered 10 years earlier in California's Mammoth Mountains. The murders mysteriously resume when they return to the area.

ADVERTISEMENT

Duke also has a fourth book in mind that will use characters from "Bad Dream." "I really do expect I'll be doing this (writing) full time down the road," said Duke. "I love to write and I'm very pleased with the reception this book is getting."

His daughter, Sarah, one of three Duke children, designed the cover for "Bad Dream" and wants to do another for her father. He said she'll get her chance.

Duke will be signing his book in front of B Dalton at West Acres Dec. 8, from 1-3 p.m.

Readers can reach Terry DeVine at (701) 241-5515 or tdevine@forumcomm.com

What To Read Next
A couple of bills introduced quietly would help feed students in public schools
Mikkel Pates set the standard for agricultural journalism during his 44-year career in the region, working for Agweek, The Forum and the Worthington Globe.
The administration at Theodore Roosevelt National Park is bent on getting rid of the horses, which means getting rid of vital living history and a major draw to the park.
Fargo city commission hand-wringing over northside Red River crossing is short-sighted