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KEVIN WALLEVAND

If you have been through building or remodeling a home, you know how hard it is to visualize what a kitchen or living room will look like from a blueprint. But technology has changed everything, and a Fargo software developer has turned home building into a video game.
There is a new softball team that may not be winning all the games, but they came to play for all the right reasons.
After decades of moving hundreds of homes and barns up and down the region, the Schmits are calling it a career.
Yard drew attention from the city after a neighbor complained about her lawn full of blooming flowers.

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Latest Headlines
After the recent loss of her son, a Fergus Falls mom has helped start a Pride Festival.
An incredible story of forgiveness and healing that brought two families together. All because of a young man lost to war in Vietnam decades ago.
The Red River Ox Cart trails carved and snaked their way across northwestern Minnesota. In the mid-1800s, those dirt trails became a lifeline for settlers.
It wasn't that many weeks ago many claimed the unfortunate bragging rights to a late snowstorm that dropped a couple feet of snow in some parts of North Dakota. Now, heat is once again putting us on the map.
Landmark legislation in Washington, D.C., this week not only helps veterans exposed to burn pits from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, it helps veterans who have been battling Agent Orange-related illnesses since they returned from Vietnam.
Volunteers hope to raise $150,000 through an elk tag raffle so the program can continue to change the lives of children with autism or other special needs.

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An Otter Tail County mom is using her grief and healing after losing a daughter to suicide to help other families in a unique way.
There is no other place on earth where a farm crisis looms larger than Ukraine. Now, North Dakota farmers are reaching out across an ocean to help.
It was just over a year ago, that 15-year-old Liam Medd died by suicide. There were no red flags. No warnings. But his family stepped up right away to use the sport he loved and get the message about mental health awareness and getting our community to lift the veil, and talk about it.

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