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HORACE

The once quiet bedroom community could hit 5,000 residents by the end of the year. It recently added a pharmacy, and is in line for a Sanford Health medical clinic, a Catholic parish hall, and for lovers of treats, a Dairy Queen.
The issue arose after the West Fargo School District, which serves the Horace area, objected to their share of costs for street projects, also known as special assessments.
The fast-food favorite known for its soft-serve ice cream, shakes, burgers and fries will likely open in October, an owner said.
The small Fargo-Moorhead area bedroom community just south of West Fargo gets an important need filled for its residents.

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Mayor Kory Peterson said the implication by the school district was that it could lose another elementary school if the formula is raised too high as Horace adopts a new overall special assessment policy for the growing community.
The 160-acre wetland will be built along Drain 27, which drains part of south Fargo, east of Horace.
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Ryan Richard built a new farmstead when the original plan for the Fargo-Moorhead Flood Diversion threatened his original farmstead. But the route of the revised diversion project now runs through his new farmstead, a setback he said will cost him millions of dollars.
A number of Memorial Day events are planned for the area for Monday, May 30.
Horace is considering a change to its special assessment policy
The American Legion posts in Horace, North Dakota, and Wolverton, Minnesota, are planning a number of events for Memorial Day on Monday, May 30.

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After Robert Otterson read a national article on the death of the summer job several years ago, he knew one thing. He was going to raise sons who knew how to work. So it made sense for Ottersons' two sons, Chase and Dillon, to join forces with his friend Dustin Roberge's same-age sons, Taylor and Chase, when the older boys got to middle school. Since then, their 4Bs Lawn Service has become a growing mowing business.
For more than a week, people in rural Horace have been watching water creep toward their homes, rush over and close off roads, and fill farm fields.  
Gene and Brenda Sauvageau argued that an expedited eminent domain process was unfair and illegal. They own almost 8 acres needed for the metro flood diversion project.

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