It may come as a shock to you but the man who runs the NCAA, Mark Emmert, really doesn't know anything about the Football Championship Subdivision..

In an interview Tuesday with ESPN in describing the challenges of trying to play college football in the midst of a pandemic, he described the FCS, the division that North Dakota State and the University of North Dakota play in, "with a 20 team playoff and a round-robin format."

I wasn't sure what to be more upset with. First the playoff field is 24 teams, second a round robin format? You could have 200 games played before you crown a champion.

This comes on the heels of some interesting comments from ESPN college analyst David Pollack. "The FCS canceled its football season thru the fall. How about the FCS be spring football from now on? I would love to see that more than anything. Not as many of those guys are you worried about about going to the NFL."

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Bison quarterback Trey Lance had a quick response to those comments. "It's a no from us, and yes A LOT of us have league dreams."

Yes we live in the capital of the FCS, but this underscores a larger point. FCS football, while huge here, doesn't register around the country. Despite College Gameday making a fourth FCS trip last season, a majority of fans would probably have a hard time naming teams beyond NDSU and James Madison.

It's disappointing and also indicative of where FCS is in the power ranking of the NCAA.

Near the bottom.

Emmert just confirmed what everyone outside of a few cities around the country already knows.

North Dakota State's Michael Tutsie returns an interception against Montana State during the NCAA FCS semifinal at the Fargodome on Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019 that helped seal another trip to Frisco, Texas, for the Bison. David Samson / The Forum
North Dakota State's Michael Tutsie returns an interception against Montana State during the NCAA FCS semifinal at the Fargodome on Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019 that helped seal another trip to Frisco, Texas, for the Bison. David Samson / The Forum