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Fish reproduction surveys play vital role in North Dakota lake management

In this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors, Mike Anderson takes us to Lake Sakakawea where fisheries biologists are conducting their annual fish reproduction surveys.

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North Dakota Game and Fish biologists pull in a net filled with small fish to survey on Lake Sakakawea.
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BISMARCK — North Dakota Game and Fish fisheries biologists spend a lot of time in fall surveying district lakes and the Missouri River System in North Dakota looking for natural fish reproduction, spring fish stocking success and forage conditions.

In this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors, Mike Anderson takes us to Lake Sakakawea where fisheries biologists are conducting their annual fish reproduction surveys.

"Basically, we're looking at how the year went for reproduction of fish, everything from sport fish down to forage species. So it gives us a snapshot of how well things were for the fish reproduction that year,” says fisheries supervisor Dave Fryda.

On a statewide level, fish reproduction and stocking success were above average on most lakes surveyed this fall.

MORE NEWS RELATING TO ND GAME & FISH:
Aquatic nuisance species violations were the top issues in the fishing realm, followed by anglers exceeding the limit for fish species.

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