Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

National Forest Christmas tree permits now available online

Permits also still available at local ranger stations.

christms tree permits
Natinal forests across the Northland offfer $5 permits for cutting wild Christmas trees. The permits are now available onliine at recreation.gov as well as at local ranger stations. (U.S. Forest Service photo)
We are part of The Trust Project.

DULUTH — Anyone who wants to cut a Christmas tree in a national forest needs to get a $5 permit first, but now those permits are now available online.

Permits are available at recreation.gov . Search for the name of the forest and “Christmas Tree Permits.” You will need to set up or log into an existing Recreation.gov account to complete the transaction. You can also check out the rules and areas where trees can be cut.

As in the past, permits also can be purchased in person at national forest ranger stations.

“For many families, venturing into a National Forest to cut their Christmas tree for the holidays is a treasured tradition carried on for generations,” Ann Niesen, acting deputy forest supervisor for the Superior National Forest, said. “For families creating new traditions, a trip to their local forest to cut their own Christmas tree may be a thrilling experience as they discover the joy of hiking through the forest in search of the perfect holiday centerpiece.”

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.
What to read next
Snow Friday will be followed by some chilly temperatures
Do you have a fishing or hunting photo you'd like to share? Send your photos to bdokken@gfherald.com.
The Center for Biological Diversity says current plan neglects huge swaths of current and potential wolf range.
From license sales to excise taxes, membership in clubs and volunteering, hunters have always stepped up to try to improve the outdoor world.