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North Dakota Fish Challenge highlights state's native species

Those catching and registering each of the four species are eligible for a certificate and sticker from the NDGF.

YellowPerch.jpg
An angler lands a yellow perch.
Contributed / North Dakota Game and Fish Department
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BISMARCK — The North Dakota Fish Challenge runs May 1 to Aug. 15 and offers anglers fishing North Dakota waters to earn a certificate and sticker by catching four native species of fish, channel catfish, smallmouth bass, yellow perch and northern pike.

Cayla Bendel, R3 coordinator for the NDGF, says state's " Where to Fish " page is a good way to help you find lakes that have one or more of these species.

"We'll try to get some current anglers maybe fishing for a new species or trying a new body of water near them, kind of looking around at some of the many lakes that we have, and maybe they'll get excited about targeting that species in the future," Bendel says. "I think we have a lot of different diverse fisheries in the state and this is a great way to get people exploring those."

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