Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

North Dakota Outdoors: How the lakes fared this winter

North Dakota Game and Fish Department fisheries biologists just finished dissolved oxygen testing on many lakes across the state. Mike Anderson explains in this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors.

ndgflake.jpg
A meter is dropped below the ice to check oxygen measurements at various lake depths.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department

BISMARCK — Every year from mid-to-late February, fisheries biologists check lakes to see how they fared through North Dakota’s leanest months.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department fisheries biologists just finished dissolved oxygen testing on many lakes across the state. Mike Anderson explains in this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors.

“Our fisheries crews have a select number of lakes that they go to every year to monitor," says Scott Gangl, NDGF fisheries supervisor. "They go out and drill holes in the ice, and they have meters that they drop down into the ice and do profiles. So they take oxygen measurements at various depths all the way from the surface to the bottom to see how that lake is doing.”

MORE NEWS RELATING TO ND GAME & FISH:
In this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors, Mike Anderson tells us about the Take Someone New Ice Fishing Challenge, and how you could possibly win a fish house.
"A bill before the Legislature in Bismarck ... would remove from the North Dakota Game and Fish Department their authority to regulate deer baiting. ... This is foolishness."
Bochenski says the president of UND told him that Chinese students and faculty feel "uncomfortable." Also, a state veterinarian weighs in on controversy around deer baiting.
While larger communities may have several hunter education classes, many North Dakota towns may have only one course each year.
Shane Johnson of Minot caught 19-pound, 8-ounce burbot Jan. 3 from the Garrison Dam Tailrace.
While outdoors enjoying winter activities it’s important to keep your distance from wintering wildlife. Mike Anderson explains in this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors.
Hunters are surveyed about their hunting activity because understanding how many animals were removed from the population is an important ecological piece of information.
With new boat registrations coming in and the state Legislature in session, it’s a busy time at the North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

Biologists were pleasantly surprised with dissolved oxygen testing results.

“Considering how dry and severe the drought was last year, we lost quite a bit of water across the state and so we were kind of expecting to see more widespread winterkill in places," Gangl says. "And then we started getting some snow cover this winter and we've got some pretty heavy snow cover in certain areas and that just compounds to it. So we thought we were going to see a lot worse conditions out there than we did.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Gangl says there are a few lakes with winterkill potential, but they are lakes that typically had problems in the past.

Overall, even with dry conditions, most lakes did well this winter.

What To Read Next
Many of the species are predisposed to be sedentary and lurk in hard-to-find places. Some may "learn" to avoid anglers altogether.
The excursion would be, in some ways, an attempt to find common ground over the recent debate about snowmobiles in the Grand Forks Greenway.
To get an event in the Outdoors Calendar, contact Brad Dokken at (701) 780-1148, (800) 477-6572 ext. 1148 or by email at bdokken@gfherald.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Wednesdays.
The Manitoba Naturalists Society book, “Birds of Manitoba,” includes more than three dozen citations to Robert Nero's work, most of them having to do with great gray owls.