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North Dakota Outdoors: Now is the time to take a hunter safety course

If you plan to hunt this year and haven’t taken a certified hunter education course, now is the time to sign up. Mike Anderson explains in this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors.

Canada goose hunting
North Dakota's hunter education program is offered in many cities across the state. There are a few options to complete the course to fit your schedule.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department photo
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BISMARCK — If you were born after 1961, are 12 years or older, you must take a certified hunter education course prior to obtaining a firearm or bowhunting license in North Dakota.

And this winter is a good time to get certified and avoid the potential crush before the fall hunting seasons begin.

“The vast majority of our courses occur from January through May," says Brian Schaffer, North Dakota hunter education coordinator. "We've been working on encouraging more courses throughout the summer months, but calling the department in August, saying you need to find hunter education course with it being a volunteer led program, the majority of our classes are not going to be occurring right before hunting season.”

MORE HUNTING COVERAGE:
Do you have a fishing or hunting photo you'd like to share? Send your photos to bdokken@gfherald.com.
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