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North Dakota Outdoors: Seasonal employees play vital role to Game and Fish Department

Roles are mainly within the fisheries and wildlife divisions, ranging from aquatic nuisance inspectors to wildlife technicians who perform jobs such as wildlife banding to placing signs across the state.

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Marty Egeland, North Dakota Game and Fish Department outreach biologist in Grand Forks, teaches a group of seventh-graders from South Middle School in Grand Forks the difference between antlers and horns during day one of Eco-Ed camp in 2016. Today, most full-time Game and Fish employees started out as seasonal workers with the department.
Eric Hylden / Grand Forks Herald
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BISMARCK — The North Dakota Game and Fish Department hires dozens of seasonal employees, especially during the spring and summer months.

In this episode of North Dakota Outdoors, Bill Haase, the assistant wildlife division chief, joins host Mike Anderson to explain the importance of seasonal employees.

Roles are mainly within the fisheries and wildlife divisions, ranging from aquatic nuisance inspectors to wildlife technicians who perform jobs such as wildlife banding to placing signs across the state.

Anderson says more than 50% of full-time NDGF staff started out as seasonals, and Haase said its even higher, about 80%, in the fisheries and wildlife divisions.

NDGF has seven different locations where a seasonal employee could be stationed, Haase said.

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Seasonal employees may also get the opportunity to learn how to operate large equipment, learn trade skills and move into supervisory roles down the line.

MORE NEWS RELATING TO ND GAME & FISH:
"The week is designed to help raise public awareness for aquatic nuisance species and the steps we can take to prevent them from getting into our waterways," says Ben Holen, North Dakota Game and Fish Department ANS coordinator.

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To get an event in the Outdoors Calendar, contact Brad Dokken at (701) 780-1148, (800) 477-6572 ext. 1148 or by email at bdokken@gfherald.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Wednesdays.