JERSEY CITY, N.J. - The teams playing in Super Bowl XLVIII, the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks, are from the two states where recreational marijuana use has been legalized.

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll on Monday said he agrees with the possibility of the NFL investigating medicinal use of the drug for the best possible care of players.

"I would say we have to explore and find ways to make our game a better game," said Carroll at Seahawks' Westin Hotel headquarters, "and take care of our players in whatever way possible. Regardless of what other stigmas might be involved, we have to do this because the world of medicine is doing this."

Medicinal marijuana is legal in 20 states and the District of Columbia.

"I would say that we have to explore and find ways to make our game a better game and take care of our players in the best way possible," Carroll said at a news conference Monday following his team's first practice of Super Bowl week.

WDAY logo
listen live
watch live

"The fact that it's in the world of medicine is obviously something the commissioner realizes. Regardless of what other stigmas might be involved, we have to do this because the world of medicine is trying to do the exact same thing and figure it out, and they're coming to some conclusions."

The Seahawks practiced for the first time at the New York Giants facility. They did not go outside. The temperature climbed into the very low 30s.

"We had a great workout today," Carroll insisted. "It was a bonus Monday for us, so the guys really took to it. We had great tempo and enthusiasm, and everything was really cool, so we're off to a great start."

If Carroll, 62, sounds like a hip Northern Californian, well he was born in San Francisco, grew up in Marin County and played for University of Pacific, which is located in Stockton, Calif.

Conditions are a bit more extreme in Seattle, and Carroll was not at all intimidated by forecasts of possible snow for the game.

"We play in an area that has somewhat inclement weather occasionally," said Carroll, alluding to rain rather than snow, "so it's not something we're bothered by."