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WILDLIFE

Recently released video by the Voyageurs Wolf Project offers an intimate look at the busy lives of wolves, bears, moose, otters and lynx that call the national park home.
Feeding wildlife, especially during the winter in North Dakota, once was common practice embraced by most wildlife professionals. That philosophy has gradually evolved.
Cougar sightings have become more common in Minnesota than they were 20 years ago, but the Department of Natural Resources maintains the state does not have a breeding population of the big cats.
Closer to home, I’ve never encountered anything that rivals a mountain lion, but there definitely have been a few encounters that stand out.

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The onetime Hawk Ridge bird counter is now trying to make it as a full-time artist.
Bradley writes, "Unfortunately, North Dakota ranks 13th in the nation for most wildlife-vehicle collisions. As we continue to develop communities, expand oil and gas industries, widen roads, and increase motor vehicle speeds, incidents of wildlife-vehicle collisions will expand exponentially."
Suit seeks to restore federal protections across most of the Lower 48 states.
Slocum Taxidermy opened in 1995; has grown to include customers throughout Midwest, including Scheels.
Zookeepers, animal anesthesiologists, biomedical researchers, veterinary surgeons and exotic animal farriers raced to treat Skeeter in the few minutes they could safely let him be on the ground. Giraffes did not evolve to be off their feet, and it is one of the most dangerous things that can happen to them.
Tom Rusch was part of state's annual moose survey, championed sharptail grouse.

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Bryan and Bryce Sombke, who promote a 500-acre natural bird hunting and gun dog enterprise near Conde, South Dakota, and help on the family’s 2,000-acre farm, were among those hit in an unusual Aug. 28, 2021, hail storm. The storm brought high winds and softball-sized hail, and killed deer and decimated the bird population, as well as flattening 7- to 8-foot-tall corn and Conservation Reserve Program lands.
Wisconsin DNR naturalist Ryan Brady travels across northern Wisconsin looking after some of the state’s lesser-known and definitely lesser-seen creatures.
The mysterious stranger toddled into Noreen and Lee Thomas's yard last Monday, looking tall and pale and beady-eyed. They didn't know how long he planned to stay; he carried nothing but a gray pouch. But for the next three days, Kevin, the White American Pelican, terrified the chickens, schooled the dogs and followed the Thomases around as if they were walleye vending machines.

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