Here is a quick round-up of some of our top stories this week


In August 2001, the Minneapolis FBI was on a race to stop a 9/11 conspirator

Zacarias Moussaoui, shown in an Aug. 17, 2001, police photo, was detained by immigration authorities in Minnesota after trying to buy training time on a Northwest Airlines jet simulator in Eagan, Minnesota. (KRT / St. Paul Pioneer Press)
Zacarias Moussaoui, shown in an Aug. 17, 2001, police photo, was detained by immigration authorities in Minnesota after trying to buy training time on a Northwest Airlines jet simulator in Eagan, Minnesota. (KRT / St. Paul Pioneer Press)

ST. PAUL — On Feb. 23, 2001, Zacarias Moussaoui stepped off an airplane that flew him from the United Kingdom, where he was living, into Chicago.

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His entrance to America was legal: As a French citizen, he was permitted to stay in the U.S. for up to 90 days without obtaining a visa. He could legally stay until May 22, 2001.

But he would overstay that period and, over the course of six months, take flying lessons throughout the country as a member of al-Qaida’s network, which plotted and carried out the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.


Hate crime turned hoax shocked Fargo-Moorhead in 1995

Supporters march for the Kabob House on Oct. 24, 1995, in Fargo.
Nick Carlson / The Forum
Supporters march for the Kabob House on Oct. 24, 1995, in Fargo. Nick Carlson / The Forum

FARGO — Federal hate crime laws hadn’t been on the books long when the Fargo-Moorhead community faced a possible race-related crime, a major case that spurred public demonstrations and donations.

It came on a Monday, early in the evening of Oct. 23, 1995, outside a Middle Eastern restaurant in a strip mall along 25th Street and 32nd Avenue South.

A woman, who appeared to have been bound and gagged, rushed out of the burning family business. She would tell police she’d been attacked by unknown assailants and that they’d carved a crude cross into her abdomen.


Addictive 'American Crime Story' turns President Bill Clinton's impeachment into must-see TV

Sarah Paulson as Linda Tripp and Beanie Feldstein as Monica Lewinsky in "Impeachment: American Crime Story." (Tina Thorpe/FX/TNS)
Sarah Paulson as Linda Tripp and Beanie Feldstein as Monica Lewinsky in "Impeachment: American Crime Story." (Tina Thorpe/FX/TNS)

Impeachment as entertainment might seem impossible after years of slogging through the real thing. The Trump administration brought us day after day of melodrama, including overwrought performances on the House floor, and never fully stuck the landing.

But the FX drama "Impeachment: American Crime Story" manages to turn the dismal state of our democracy into a must-see limited series, pulling the narrative back to the quaint 1990s, when President Bill Clinton's (Clive Owen) relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky (Beanie Feldstein) was presented as a national crisis.


5 true crime shows to binge this fall

A person holds a TV remote to select a movie to watch. Photo by Jonas Leupe on Unsplash.com
A person holds a TV remote to select a movie to watch. Photo by Jonas Leupe on Unsplash.com

1. 'This Is a Robbery: The World's Biggest Art Heist'


Fistfights, rocks, riot police: 34 years ago, South Dakota's largest workforce walked off slaughterhouse jobs

The pork-processing facility (shown on Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2021) in Sioux Falls is now known as Smithfield's, but the older part of the building still carries the iconic "Morrell's" logo, from when John Morrell and Company led the slaughterhouse. (Christopher Vondracek / Forum News Service)
The pork-processing facility (shown on Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2021) in Sioux Falls is now known as Smithfield's, but the older part of the building still carries the iconic "Morrell's" logo, from when John Morrell and Company led the slaughterhouse. (Christopher Vondracek / Forum News Service)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — There were fistfights in the street. And trucks blocked at the loading dock.

It was spring, 1987. And Sioux Falls' largest employer -- a slaughterhouse built like a fortress -- had shuddered to a stop as over 2,500 workers honored a picket line, effectively walking off the job.

Over the course of the next six months, the saga of the assembly-line butchers at John Morrell and Co. would incur a local judge's wrath, test a town's loyalties, and ultimately become a casualty of a bitter fight waged by the Reagan Administration against labor interests.


Travel the planet with Dakota Spotlight

Dakota Spotlight Podcast
Dakota Spotlight Podcast

Here in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota summer is about to wind down.

Why not do some last-minute (virtual) traveling with Dakota Spotlight Podcast. Check out the summer series featuring seven fascinating interviews with podcast producers, each looking for answers and seeking justice in their own corner of the world.


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