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CORN

Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
The U.S. Attorney’s office has indicted Kent Pfaff, a Washburn, North Dakota, area farmer for federal crop insurance fraud.
In December, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a long-awaited biofuel blending mandate proposal that cut ethanol requirements for 2020 and 2021 but restored them to 15 billion gallons for 2022. Farmers and biofuel producers criticized the rollbacks but welcomed the restoration this year. But, in recent weeks, administration officials have considered rolling back the 15 billion gallon mandate when the final rule is issued later this year, the two sources told Reuters.
Robert Waldon John Anderson, 67, on May 6 pleaded guilty to one count of conversion of Commodity Credit Corporation security. U.S. District Judge Nancy E. Brasel sentenced Anderson to three years of probation, 150 hours of community service and restitution of $1,403,578.40.

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The Honeyford grain elevator, North Dakota's oldest cooperative elevator, is the first south of the U.S.-Canadian border to load an 8,500-foot — 1.6 miles-long — unit train. The train full of corn was bound for Canada.
Gerald Bachmeier, chief executive officer of Red Trail Energy, Richardton, North Dakota, and Philip Coffin, vice president of Midwest AgEnergy LLC, at Underwood, North Dakota, discuss countermoves to a drought for acquiring local corn and getting it from eastern producers. Both companies started their histories by bringing corn in on unit trains and are preparing to do it again. Both are planning to inject and store carbon dioxide byproducts for a market advantage.
“The timing of the rain was too late to make a difference for our earliest soybeans, but it did help many of our later fields fill pods better,” according to one farmer in Valley City, North Dakota.
The sale barn operators at Napoleon, North Dakota, and a nearby rancher say producers face difficult choices after a disastrous cropping season, followed by several inches of rain.
Drought has significantly affected cattle producers in the northern part of North Dakota. They’re getting more rain now, but a Devils Lake, North Dakota, sale barn saw twice the number of summer culling, and calf-dependent ranchers in western counties near Towner, North Dakota, are scrambling for winter feed.
A small organic farm family near Le Sueur, Minnesota, and a larger, non-GMO farmer near Kasson, Minnesota, are among those hit hard by the Pipeline Foods bankruptcy, which sent shockwaves through the region’s organic markets. The company is asking the courts to let them sell inventory grain to pay off the secured creditors, not the farmers who deliver it. The case leaves farmers wondering whether the state does enough to protect farmers and verify the financial soundness of grain traders.

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Mike and Kristi Blattner, owners of Produce Plus in Eyota, have been selling coveted sweet corn for over 30 years. They continue to grow each year.
University of Minnesota Extension specialists spent the day on July 8 demonstrating trials at its plot in Rochester.
Some areas got over an inch of steady rainfall Sunday, June 20, according to WDAY StormTRACKER meterologists.

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