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CORONAVIRUS

A small county in Tennessee for much of the past year has reported the highest COVID-19 vaccination rate in Tennessee and one of the highest in the South. If only it were true. The rate in Meigs County was artificially inflated by a data error that distorted most of Tennessee’s county-level vaccination rates by attributing tens of thousands of doses to the wrong counties, according to a KHN review of Tennessee’s vaccination data. When the Tennessee Department of Health quietly corrected the error last month, county rates shifted overnight, and Meigs County’s rate of fully vaccinated people dropped from 65% to 43%, which is below the state average and middling in the rural South.
Two former Mayo Clinic employees — Shelly Kiel of Owatonna and Sherry Ihde of Zumbro Falls — filed lawsuits this week claiming they were unfairly fired for refusing COVD-19 vaccines. Their attorney said he will be filing more than 100 similar ones against Mayo Clinic as well as Olmsted Medical Center.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends isolating COVID patients for at least five days, preferably in a separate room with access to their own bathroom, as well as diligent mask-wearing for both patient and caregiver. But for many families, those aren’t easy options. But take heart: Scientists say there is still a lot people can do to protect their families, chief among them improving ventilation and filtration of the air.
It is unclear how much demand is there for the third dose in the 5-11 age group. Just 28.8% of children aged 5 to 11 are fully vaccinated, according to the latest CDC data.

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A KHN review of about a dozen state and county agencies’ grants shows that while some have allocated large portions of the CDC money for projects, they still have spent only a small proportion. Mounting unspent COVID relief dollars is one of the key reasons Republicans in Congress oppose Democrats’ efforts to appropriate billions more federal dollars for managing the pandemic.
The symptoms that linger after a COVID-19 infection can be puzzling and worrisome. Fatigue, breathing issues and brain fog can last for months. And because the disease has been around for only about two years, no one knows how much longer they may last.
New variants are driving the latest surge with hospitalizations and deaths now on the rise.
The United States on Wednesday reached more than 1 million COVID-19 deaths, according to a Reuters tally, crossing a once-unthinkable milestone about two years after the first cases upended everyday life. The loss represents about one death for every 327 Americans, or more than the entire population of San Francisco or Seattle.
Overall, testing at community sites is down to lows not seen since last summer -- right before the Omicron variant hit, when the state was averaging 4,000 to 6,000 tests per day.
The Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Program is for patients recovering from COVID-19 and is offered at all Essentia locations.

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'Mr. Burns' will now start on May 19.
The national studies have found that patients with COVID-19 were much more likely to die of a heart attack in the hospital compared to pre-pandemic averages. The studies also discovered that patients who are vaccinated against COVID had better outcomes.
A seemingly endless stream of “subvariants” of omicron, the most recent Greek-letter variant, has emerged in the past few months. How different are these subvariants from one another? Can infection by one subvariant protect someone from infection by another subvariant? And how well are the existing coronavirus vaccines doing against the subvariants? We asked medical and epidemiological experts these and other questions.

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