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FARGO-MOORHEAD DIVERSION

For more than a week, people in rural Horace have been watching water creep toward their homes, rush over and close off roads, and fill farm fields.  
Gene and Brenda Sauvageau argued that an expedited eminent domain process was unfair and illegal. They own almost 8 acres needed for the metro flood diversion project.
WDAY's Kerstin Kealy compiled this collection of footage and interviews to provide a stirring account of Fargo-Moorhead's struggle to contain the Red River in the spring of 1997.
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Twenty-five years ago, on April 18, 1997, Fargo-Moorhead fought the worst Red River flood in a century. It was a wake-up call that showed the cities were vulnerable against once unimaginable floods.

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The County Highway Department will raise and regrade County Road 18, meaning the road’s overpass at I-29 closed Friday, April 1.
Today, Butler's house sits alone where once there were so many homes with children the same age the neighborhood formed a babysitting co-op.
Later this year construction will be under way for all three control structures and the 30-mile diversion channel to protect the Fargo-Moorhead metro area from extreme flooding.
The exit and bridge to Hickson and Oxbow are to be shut down.
The Metro Flood Diversion Authority is hosting a series of informational meetings to explain flowage easements that will be negotiated with landowners in the flood project's upstream staging area.
Roers CEO Jim Roers, McKenzy Braaten of EPIC Companies and Mike Allmendinger of Kilbourne Group discussed the long-term future of development in the metro area, upcoming projects and possibilities for a new convention center.

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At the current rate of development, Fargo will have space to accommodate growth for 40 to 50 years. City officials will be examining the land development code with an eye to managing growth with geographical limits imposed by the diversion project.
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Some holdout landowners argue Oxbow homeowners were given preferential treatment in diversion buyouts
The diversion, already on track for completion on schedule, just got a huge boost from a commitment for the $437 million that fulfills the federal share of the flood-control project.

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