ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

GUNS

Neither descriptions of the suspect nor information on how many suspects may have been involved was provided by authorities.
The bill that narrowly passed the U.S. House of Representatives would make it a crime to sell, manufacture or possess semiautomatic assault weapons or high-capacity ammunition feeding devices.
The deeply divided House voted 217-203 -- with no Republicans in support -- to advance the bill toward passage, after the Senate passed the legislation late on Thursday.
The court's conservative majority said in a 6-3 ruling that the Constitution puts these decisions in the hands of gun owners, not with local officials, county sheriffs or others who fear that too many guns on the street are a threat to public safety.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The bill would increase background checks for would-be gun buyers aged 18 to 21 by providing law enforcement more time to do the checks and incentivizing states to provide juvenile records to the analysis.
North Dakota Senator Kevin Cramer speaks about recent controversies about his comments about red flag laws, the gun control debate in general, what we can do about high gas prices, and the on-going Jan. 6 committee hearings.
Weeks after the Uvalde school shooting, what steps the country will take to prevent another attack of this magnitude remain unclear. Frustrated doctors are clamoring for broad measures to curb the rise in gun violence.
A local pastor read the words of a mother who lost her child in the Uvalde, Texas, mass shooting, saying gun violence is not acceptable in society.
Most Americans support gun safety laws including background checks and red flag laws. It's past time to take steps to save lives from gun violence. Here are places to start.
Authors report that mass shootings cause almost six people to be injured for every one person killed, with 44% leaving disabled and carrying $65,000 in average hospital charges. Emergency medicine experts say AR-15 style weapons create extreme increase in bodily damage.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I will do what I have to because my kids should not go to a school with a flag at half-staff because kids their age were murdered in their classroom,” said Missy Dodds after the Uvalde shooting. "No more. Never again." Seventeen years ago, Dodds survived the Red Lake, Minnesota, school shooting.
The Hermantown congressman opposed a pair of bills introduced after mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York.
Rep. Karla Rose Hanson, a Democrat from Fargo, joins this episode of Plain Talk to discuss guns and gun control. Also on this episode, Wednesday co-host Chad Oban and I talk about out predictions for the upcoming June primaries.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT