ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

HELP WANTED PROJECT

Throughout the pandemic, rural health care facilities have been overwhelmed, and an already strained workforce is partly to blame. According to Brad Gibbens, acting director of the Center for Rural Health at UND, workforce is the most important policy issue in rural health, especially nearly two years into the COVID-19 pandemic.
The pandemic and recovery are part of the issue, but the conditions generating the lack of workers existed long before the first COVID-19 infections in the U.S., said Joe Hobot, president and CEO of the American Indian OIC.
Regional hiring experts said workers are likely to benefit from continued shortages into 2022.
Solving the future workforce challenges in the Midwest will take collaboration and innovation from businesses, communities, educational institutions and government working together to recruit, prepare and train our future workforce.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
They were called heroes for the first time in their lives, for their willingness to work at a time when bars, restaurants and fitness centers were closed to stem the tide of a deadly virus. These reliable employees played key roles in sustaining critical elements of the economy at a time of uncertain peril when so little was known about COVID-19. In Rochester, Minnesota, a handful of these everyday workers represents a microcosm of all of those who kept life moving when everything else stopped.
Many new Americans made their way through the pandemic and hurdled all the same obstacles as their neighbors, but often with one hand tied by cultural divides or language barriers or the like. But there’s change happening in 2021, as the economy slowly recovers from the worst of COVID. Businesses across Minnesota and North Dakota are struggling to find help as the “Great Resignation,” as it’s begun to be called, sweeps across the country. But it’s not clear how much that will help new Americans.
EDITOR’S NOTE: It's called "The Great Resignation," a seismic upheaval in the workforce that is reshaping today's economy. This week, Forum Communication Co. reporters will look at The Great Resignation's profound effects on workers and businesses across the region in our multi-part series, “Help Wanted.”
Raising pay, adjusting operations are among the responses at businesses across the Upper Midwest.
Teen employment rates, while historically lower than for older people, have rebounded faster since the COVID-19 pandemic began.
Even the pandemic’s grip on the economy loosens, a new challenge is cropping up for child care professionals at the new facility, and for teachers, across the region: an apparent labor shortage. 

ADVERTISEMENT

The reasons prompting US workers to quit range from the practical -- a need for a flexible schedule and a livable wage -- to more intangible needs, such as the desire to feel valued.
“Help wanted” signs are everywhere. Job specialists say people won’t take a job unless it pays at least $15 an hour. Since April, workers have been voluntarily leaving their jobs at a rate of 4 million people — that’s more people than the populations of the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington metro area — per month. What's behind this Great Resignation, and can this workforce be saved?

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT