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HISTORICAL

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The mystery of who robbed a Wahpeton bank in September 1932, endured until the man bragged about it 40 years later. He was 'Public Enemy No. 1' and 'the scourge of the Midwest.'
From supermarket bag-boy to successful entrepreneur, Clint Severson has always traced his roots back to Minot. That showed in 2010 when Severson and his wife Conni Ahart donated $1 million to establish the Severson Entrepreneurship Academy at Minot State University.
Clint Severson began his business career as a supermarket bag boy in Minot. Decades later, he was responsible for breathing new live into several healthcare companies. Read on for part two of InForum columnist Curt Eriksmoen's three-part series on Severson's life.
North Dakota history columnist Curt Eriksmoen begins the story of Clint Severson, who was raised in Minot and became an nationally-known entrepreneur and philanthropist.
Nelson E. Nelson was North Dakota's first Norwegian immigrant. That was only the beginning of his impact on the state, Curt Eriksmoen details. Nelson also played a role in moving the capital to Bismarck and had a county named in his honor.
Early Bismarck was actually a collection of three different small towns that were established mainly to cater to the desires of soldiers, railroad workers, gamblers and land speculators.

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Minnesota in the 1930s. While St. Paul was considered a crook’s haven for mobsters to lay low, the infamous Al Capone was known to wander up North for rest and respite. Some point to St. Paul law enforcement as the key instigators in making Minnesota mob-friendly.
The work of Helen Hughes Dulany was elaborately displayed in some of the leading magazines of the era and Helen was contracted to design products for some of the largest companies in the U.S.
History columnist Curt Eriksmoen explains why we still don't know if Lewis was shot by someone else or died by suicide.

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