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KID BOSSES

This tag is for a series of stories by Tammy Swift about young entrepreneurs who have started their own businesses.

Katja Engebretson taught herself to make elaborately iced cookies by watching YouTube, then started selling them so she could buy an African pygmy hedgehog. Now her KJMakes cottage business will provide a nice side hustle as she pursues dreams of becoming a 911 operator.
Check out what the business team is following this week.
Little Michelle Loueng has been asking for a cat for her birthday for years. Then her mom suggested the family do something that could potentially provide a home for not just one cat, but for several: Hold a fundraiser. For the last couple of years, they've made and sold hot cocoa bombs, then donated most of the proceeds to local animal shelters.
For Livvy Caroon, entrepreneurship is in the blood. Livvy's mom, Laura, co-founded the popular networking organization Ladyboss Fargo-Moorhead. But Laura says she didn't have to use stage-mom tactics to convince her daughter into launching Livvy's Luxury Lab, a business of homemade soaps and fidget spinners. Livvy just thought it would be fun to try.

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In addition to balancing the usual kid things like soccer, softball, music and theater, this diminutive dynamo already has launched two businesses. One of them, Ramp Girl, requires foraging and providing ramps — a coveted, hard-to-find wild onion — to Fargo's fancier eateries.
Got a Dad who hates cleaning the family fleet? We profile three entrepreneurial teens who run their own detailing businesses: Oscar Bergeson and Ethan Pepsin of Car Kings, and Griffin Cassola of Top Shelf Detailing, LLC, Fargo.
During his poop patrols, Oscar Stebleton of Oscar's Pooper-Scooping and Dog Walking has unearthed the remains of numerous curious items which a dog has tried to digest. A leather shoulder strap to a purse. Socks. Slippers. Eyeglasses. Ear buds. Yarn. And even a sequined face mask.
As a fourth grader, Olivia Mae Smith started out charging her schoolmates for slime to cover her ingredient costs. A couple of businesses later, she has mastered a notoriously difficult cookie — the French macaron — and is selling it online.
After Robert Otterson read a national article on the death of the summer job several years ago, he knew one thing. He was going to raise sons who knew how to work. So it made sense for Ottersons' two sons, Chase and Dillon, to join forces with his friend Dustin Roberge's same-age sons, Taylor and Chase, when the older boys got to middle school. Since then, their 4Bs Lawn Service has become a growing mowing business.
Listen to the latest episode of the InForum Business Beat Podcast.

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Since 2020, when then 12-year-old Willow Larson started making commemorative coffee mugs, she's been asked to create mugs for well over 30 towns throughout Minnesota, as well as several more in North Dakota and Wisconsin. Her mom, Caty, says she has sold “thousands” of the keepsakes to communities like Erskine, Ulen, Hitterdal, Hawley and Mentor.

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