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SCIENCE

Identification of new strains through whole-genome sequencing is a process far more complex than the standard lab tests used to clinically diagnose a patient with COVID-19.
The gut microbiome has been shown to play a role in ways that are both positive and negative in health. A team of researchers from Sanford Health and North Dakota State University will explore whether certain gut bacteria can trigger stress eating.
To do that, they need to bridge the gap between purely scientific researchers and clinical professionals. The SMHS has been emphasizing work in the area of translational research, which aims to “translate” scientific research into practical treatments. That work is being done through the Dakota Cancer Collaborative on Translational Activity (DaCCoTA), a clinical translational research center (CTR), that pairs in teams doctors and researchers.
Haglund writes, " (Republicans') only policy goals seem to be retaining power at all costs, cutting taxes for the rich, and valuing personal freedom above the common good."

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A breakthrough study by Johns Hopkins University researchers may aid doctors in determining which elderly patients will respond best to antidepressants and which may be at additional risks for memory decline.
This title features a panda living in China and helps foster spatial awareness
Katelyn France is in the running to win $100,000 from the Collegiate Inventors Competition for her MAQR bracelets — medical bracelets that link to emergency information when the QR code is scanned with a smartphone.
Nicole Ashpole-McBride, a native of Cavalier, N.D., and an assistant professor of pharmacology at the University of Mississippi, writes, "Human babies are not being killed to develop the COVID-19 vaccines, but human babies are dying of COVID-19."
Review: Science journalist Sam Apple investigates the lost discoveries of Otto Warburg, a German scientist who defied Nazis.
Sanford Health researchers tracked a junior high football program for eight years, using electronic monitoring in football helmets to measure head impacts. They were surprised to find out how many hits kids were taking, and noted a marked decrease in head hits as coaches implemented new training approaches.

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I recall overhearing a conversation, just a few years ago. In the midst of a cold wave, two co-workers were chuckling over the notion of climate change. But climate isn’t weather. As one scientist put it, climate change is like the biblical Four Horsemen of the apocalypse: war, famine, pestilence, and just plain old death.
Aging — biological changes over time that lead to decay and eventually death — increases the risk of chronic ailments like Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.
Dr. Andrew Badley reflects on decades of HIV research, and how the battle to eradicate the virus compares to the fight against COVID-19.

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