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SCIENCE

Williston, N.D., native and Concordia College graduate Alex Ritter's videos and glass sculptures of real-life T-cells killing cancer cells give hope in the fight.
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Dr. Stacy Trasancos, a scientist and theologian, recently spoke in Fargo about coming back to the Christian faith after walking away from God during college and her years working as a chemist for DuPont.
“The audience has to try to figure out why these women are talking at all," one of the stars of "The How and The Why" says.
Imagine a stunning new $50 million science museum somewhere in our growing metro. This community has the money. Let's dream bigger.

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Identification of new strains through whole-genome sequencing is a process far more complex than the standard lab tests used to clinically diagnose a patient with COVID-19.
The gut microbiome has been shown to play a role in ways that are both positive and negative in health. A team of researchers from Sanford Health and North Dakota State University will explore whether certain gut bacteria can trigger stress eating.
To do that, they need to bridge the gap between purely scientific researchers and clinical professionals. The SMHS has been emphasizing work in the area of translational research, which aims to “translate” scientific research into practical treatments. That work is being done through the Dakota Cancer Collaborative on Translational Activity (DaCCoTA), a clinical translational research center (CTR), that pairs in teams doctors and researchers.
Haglund writes, " (Republicans') only policy goals seem to be retaining power at all costs, cutting taxes for the rich, and valuing personal freedom above the common good."
A breakthrough study by Johns Hopkins University researchers may aid doctors in determining which elderly patients will respond best to antidepressants and which may be at additional risks for memory decline.
This title features a panda living in China and helps foster spatial awareness

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Katelyn France is in the running to win $100,000 from the Collegiate Inventors Competition for her MAQR bracelets — medical bracelets that link to emergency information when the QR code is scanned with a smartphone.
Nicole Ashpole-McBride, a native of Cavalier, N.D., and an assistant professor of pharmacology at the University of Mississippi, writes, "Human babies are not being killed to develop the COVID-19 vaccines, but human babies are dying of COVID-19."
Review: Science journalist Sam Apple investigates the lost discoveries of Otto Warburg, a German scientist who defied Nazis.

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