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WEATHER

Farm Service Agency Administrator Zach Ducheneaux and other officials visited Minnesota farms on May 19 to take a look at the damage from the storm that blew through a week before. High winds ripped apart grain bins and mangled irrigation and other equipment as well as damaging houses and other buildings.
A warmup is coming in June, but conflicting forces make it impossible to predict whether the summer will be hot and dry or hot and wet.
The Rainy River watershed is overflowing from Lake Vermilion to Lake of the Woods, with flood records possible.
One factor in making our air humid is the establishment of crops.

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The event is free and open to anyone.
Cold air moves in for the weekend with some spotty showers.
As flooding has increased in recent years, the impacts of these mitigation efforts can be seen all over.
StormTRACKER Meteorologist John Wheeler looks at the general weather patterns.
Gov. Tim Walz visited Benson and viewed some of the damage caused by a May 12 storm. State officials said people affected by the storm should take photos and document what they do in cleaning up, as the Federal Emergency Management Agency will be seeking that information when it assesses the damage in 49 affected Minnesota counties.
Nature's beauty from a weather perspective

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Most raindrops have a diameter between half a millimeter and four millimeters.
Dust devils were plentiful at this time last year.
This summer, much of the Southern Plains will experience worsening drought conditions.

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