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John Wheeler: What would happen if a hurricane remnant were to hit our region?

Weakened remnants of hurricanes and tropical systems have historically moved across portions of the Midwest.

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FARGO — There is one sort of weather the people of our region need not worry about: We are too far from the ocean to be hit by a hurricane. However, the extra-tropical remnants of Tropical Storm Cristobal moved across eastern Iowa and central Wisconsin, eventually fading into nothing near Hudson Bay. Weakened remnants of hurricanes and tropical systems have historically moved across portions of the Midwest and could conceivably pass over the Northern Plains as a low-pressure system.

Such a storm, if it remained relatively strong, could still be capable of heavy rainfall and very blustery winds lasting for many hours. Flooding and power outages would be a worst-case scenario. A relatively weak tropical storm remnant might only bring a day or two of clouds and light showers along with an observable wind circulation and humidity unusually high for autumn here in the North.

Related Topics: WEATHER
John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..
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