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Scattered severe thunderstorms possible this afternoon

Hazards include hail up to 2 inches in diameter and winds of up to 75 mph. Some isolated tornadoes and localized flooding due to heavy rains are possible, according to the National Weather Service.

PHOTO: Severe weather risk
A map from the National Weather Service depicts the likelihood for severe weather across Minnesota and North Dakota Monday, July 13. National Weather Service / Submitted Photo
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FARGO — The National Weather Service is warning of scattered severe thunderstorms from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. in areas of eastern North Dakota and northwest and west-central Minnesota.

Hazards include hail up to 2 inches in diameter and winds of up to 75 mph. Some isolated tornadoes and localized flooding due to heavy rains are possible, according to the weather service.

Strong to severe storms are forecast to begin in eastern North Dakota early in the afternoon and move east, leaving the area later this evening, weather service meteorologist Nick Carletta said.

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Flooding is most likely in northeastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota in an area stretching from as far west as Cando, N.D., and as far east as Bemidji, Minn. Potential flooding impacts include flooded intersections and rising rivers rising just beyond their banks. Grand Forks, Devils Lake, Thief River Falls, Park Rapids and Wadena are also among the cities most likely to experience flooding, though the risk is considered relatively low.

PHOTO: Flash flood potential
A map from the National Weather Service depicts the areas most likely to experience flash floods Monday afternoon, July 13. National Weather Service / Submitted Photo

"For some of the more vulnerable area there could be some isolated localized flooding," Carletta said. "For Fargo, there'd be some urban street flooding possibilites rather than anything widespread," he continued, adding the worst of the rain will move out of the Fargo are by the evening.

Tornadoes are most likely in west central Minnesota, Carletta said.

Morning showers may delay or inhibit storm development across the northern Red River Valley, according to the weather service.

Related Topics: WEATHER
Thomas Evanella is a reporter for The Forum. He's worked for The Forum for over three years, primarily reporting on business news. He's also the host of the InForum Business Beat podcast, which can be streamed at InForum.com/podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. Reach him at tevanella@forumcomm.com or by calling 701-241-5518. Follow him on Twitter @ThomasEvanella.
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