ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Spring flooding is likely, but it is too early to know how serious

FARGO — When the snow is piled high and it’s not even the middle of January, spring flooding becomes a concern. But what do we really know and what should we be doing now about the potential spring flood?

September through November precipitation in Grand Forks was 14.73 inches, by far the most on record since 1912. In Fargo, the fall rain total of 9.27 inches is in seventh place with records back to 1881. So the ground is wet. And there’s already a lot of snow.

Snowfall through December in Fargo was 34.1 inches, which is in ninth place, but more than a foot lower than the pace set in 1996. Grand Forks has had more snow, 41.8 inches, which is the third most on record but still behind 1996.

Sequence 34.Still020.jpg
Snowfall through December in Fargo was 34.1 inches, which is in ninth place, but more than a foot lower than the pace set in 1996. (WDAY)

ADVERTISEMENT

Don’t be too concerned by the piles and drifts. It looks worse than it is. Accumulated snow is about 60 to 70% air. Believe it or not, there isn’t enough snow yet to cause serious flooding. Keyword here: yet.

We still have three or four months to go. The severity of the spring flood will be determined by the water in the snow pack when it melts plus any rain that falls as it’s melting. How fast it melts can be a big factor, too. These are things we can’t know until spring.

So what should you be doing now?

Well, don’t worry. That helps nothing and no one.

Instead, plan. Talk to your insurance agent. Most home insurance policies don’t cover floods. Talk to your neighbors. Learn if your property is vulnerable. Be flood-ready.

Weather Wednesday 1/8
In Fargo, the fall rain total of 9.27 inches is in seventh place with records back to 1881. (WDAY)

What To Read Next
Get Local

ADVERTISEMENT