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WORLD WAR II

Don't despair when eyeing the high prices for this year's Thanksgiving. Instead, look back at the sacrifices our grandmas and great-grandmas made while cooking this expensive meal during wartime and the Great Depression. Tomato aspic salad, anyone?
Private First Class Robert Alexander grew up in Tolley, North Dakota, a small town near Minot. He died in the south Pacific in 1944, and recently had his remains identified. Now, he has finally returned to the United States, to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
Manned with soldiers of Norwegian heritage, 99th Infantry Battalion (Separate) fought to bring WWII to an end.
As many as a dozen women with ties to North Dakota have been identified as having served as Women's Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs.

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Longtime MSUM coach and World War II veteran Larry Macleod — who was a medic in the European and Pacific theaters — turned 100 Friday, Aug. 26, and on his birthday, he had more friends show up than candles
Pfc. Robert L. Alexander of Tolley, North Dakota, received the Bronze Star and Purple Heart awards, according to the state Department of Veterans Affairs.
Vern Otterson, a 96-year-old World War II veteran, will be presented with flag for his heroic duty. The Fargo native will receive the flag from Sen. Kevin Cramer.
“I don’t like it. It’s not right,” World War II veteran Vern Otterson said. “We were fighting against the Nazis. They were horrible. Why should anyone be running around selling Nazi stuff?”
The family of 2nd Lt. William J. McGowan was able to lay him to rest Saturday, 78 years after the 23-year-old pilot's plane was shot down on D-Day. His remains were recovered in France in 2018 and identified in 2019.
The remains of Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. William J. McGowan, a Benson native killed June 6, 1944, in France, will be buried in the Normandy American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, on Saturday.

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Eighty years ago this month, the first of 6,000 soldiers came to the Twin Cities during World War II to be trained at a covert military intelligence language school. Most were Nisei, born in the United States to Japanese immigrant parents. They would later be shipped to the Pacific theater to intercept radio signal communications, translate captured battle plans, interrogate prisoners of war, and even crawl toward enemy lines to spy on Japanese commanders.
Ruth Shephard is only one of about 30 female World War II veterans still alive in North Dakota.
Letters and diary entries spell out the family impact of losing two of their three sons in just six months.

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